Apache Server

Apache Server

The Apache HTTP Server, commonly referred to as Apache (/əˈpætʃiː/ ə-PA-chee), is a web server application notable for playing a key role in the initial growth of the World Wide Web.
Core development of the Apache Web server is performed by a group of about 20 volunteer programmers, called the Apache Group. However, because the source code is freely available, anyone can adapt the server for specific needs, and there is a large public library of Apache add-ons. In many respects, development of Apache is similar to development of the Linux operating system.

Originally based on the NCSA HTTPd server, development of Apache began in early 1995 after work on the NCSA code stalled. Apache quickly overtook NCSA HTTPd as the dominant HTTP server, and has remained the most popular HTTP server in use since April 1996. In 2009, it became the first web server software to serve more than 100 million websites.

Apache is developed and maintained by an open community of developers under the auspices of the Apache Software Foundation. Most commonly used on a Unix-like system, the software is available for a wide variety of operating systems, including Unix, FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris, Novell NetWare, OS X, Microsoft Windows, OS/2, TPF, OpenVMS and eComStation. Released under the Apache License, Apache is open-source software.

As of June 2013, Apache was estimated to serve 54.2% of all active websites and 53.3% of the top servers across all domains.

Features of Apache

Apache supports a variety of features, many implemented as compiled modules which extend the core functionality. These can range from server-side programming language support to authentication schemes. Some common language interfaces support Perl, Python, Tcl, and PHP. Popular authentication modules include mod_access, mod_auth, mod_digest, and mod_auth_digest, the successor to mod_digest. A sample of other features include Secure Sockets Layer and Transport Layer Security support (mod_ssl), a proxy module (mod_proxy), a URL rewriter (mod_rewrite), custom log files (mod_log_config), and filtering support (mod_include and mod_ext_filter).

Popular compression methods on Apache include the external extension module, mod_gzip, implemented to help with reduction of the size (weight) of web pages served over HTTP. ModSecurity is an open source intrusion detection and prevention engine for web applications. Apache logs can be analyzed through a web browser using free scripts such as AWStats/W3Perl or Visitors.

Virtual hosting allows one Apache installation to serve many different websites. For example, one machine with one Apache installation could simultaneously serve www.example.com, www.example.org, test47.test-server.example.edu, etc.

Apache features configurable error messages, DBMS-based authentication databases, and content negotiation. It is also supported by several graphical user interfaces (GUIs).

It supports password authentication and digital certificate authentication. Because the source code is freely available, anyone can adapt the server for specific needs, and there is a large public library of Apache add-ons.


Apache Server
added 5 years 2 months ago

Contents related to 'Apache Server'

Internet Information Services (IIS): Internet Information Server (IIS) is a group of Internet servers (including Web or HTTP server and FTP server) with additional capabilities for Microsoft's Windows operating systems.

Nginx Server: NGINX is the most popular open source web server for high-traffic websites, powering over 140 million overall. NGINX Plus is the fully supported, commercial version of NGINX.

- Pandas
- Angular JS
- Apache Mahout
- Apache Avro
- EHCache
- Apache Server
- Thread Pool API
- Parallel Patterns Library (PPL)
- Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP, OMP)
- Hibernate ORM
- Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
- Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ)
- Representational state transfer (REST) API
- User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
- WildFly (JBoss)
- Message Groups
- OpenWire
- Log4net
- ZeroMq (ØMQ)
- Apache NMS
5
4
3
2
1